The Long Way Down

Long Way DownApparently, conquering the world’s largest continent was not enough of for everyone’s favorite English duo. Pushing the envelope of modern adventure, Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman continue their motorcycle escapades in the television series “Long Way Down”.This time, the lines drawn on the map lead from the northern tip of Scotland to the southernmost coast of South Africa. Three years after their first adventure, “Long Way Down” takes on fourteen of the African countries. That’s right. I said fourteen.
(more…)

The Long Way Round

I just had one of the most extraordinary days on The Road of Bones. We started at 7:30 and we didn’t stop for a break ’til 6:30 this evening. They were twelve of the most exciting hours of motorcycling I’ve ever done in my life, unbelievable. The roads were just deteriorated and deteriorated. We were riding on mud, gravel, and puddles, and pot holes, and rivers, and bogs. It was just everything thrown at us at once. – Ewan McGregor

“Adventure” is one of those interesting words. It really means something different to everyone. There are adventure movies, adventure books, and adventure sports, and then there are adventure toys and adventure games. Each of these carrying a different definition and with each definition a different interpretation. At some point in history, maybe when fewer and fewer discoveries were being made, adventure has become an adjective and not a noun. Most recently, I had the pleasure of coming across what I believe is a genuine adventure, noun, not adjective.

(more…)

Saint Augustine declared…

Saint Augustine declared that “the world is a book, and those who have not traveled have read only one page.” Only firsthand experience can validate or challenge our intuitions, giving us confidence about risky political decisions in a complex world of instant feedback loops and unintended consequences. During travel, perception and thought merge; a contradiction can emerge as a truth to be revealed, not some exception to be disproved. Such ambiguity is the corollary of complexity, after all. Reality is famously resistant to theories that measure the world according to what it should be rather than how it really is. Instead, exploring the patterns of the second world aesthetically, honoring the value of purely sensory judgments — this exposes characteristics that are common to the entire second world; differences are revealed to be more relative than absolute.

Parag Khanna, The Second World: Empires and Influence in the New Global Order (2008)

More Than Money

More Than Money

Why we Travel

Link: Why We Travel

« Previous Entries Next Entries »